Tag Archives: e30

DIY Garagistic Braided Stainless Steel Brake Lines Installation

  DIY Garagistic Braided Stainless Steel Brake Lines Installation 


Welcome to another episode of Salt City Euros. Today, we’re going to installing stainless steel brake lines from Garagistic.

When replacing your brake lines, you obviously need your stainless steel brake lines, need a set of wrenches with specific wrenches to brake lines, so we have an 11, a 14, and then we have a 15 regular wrench. You need your new brake fluid, and then you need a catch can so you can drain your old brake fluid into. Now some of you may be wondering why DOT 3, why DOT 4. The core difference between the two is that DOT 4 has a higher boiling point, so actually most BMWs require DOT 4 fluid, including the e30. You can see that on your brake fluid reservoir. So especially in applications like this particular vehicle that we will be taking to the track a lot, you want to make sure that you have higher boiling brake fluid. If you ever experience brake fade, which means that you boiled your brake fluid, you definitely want to replace it right away, otherwise the regular maintenance cycle of brake fluid is about three years.

Replacing brake lines is a very straightforward task. Be very careful when dealing with dirty or old brake line fittings. Use special brake line wrenches, 11 and 14 millimeters in this case, to avoid rounding off any of the fittings. When removing the lines, brake fluid may spill, so be very careful and catch any excess with shop rags. Wipe up any spills as soon as possible. The fitting at your brake line caliper should also be a 14 millimeter fitting.

So there are many reasons why people do stainless steel brake lines; some claim it gives you a better pedal feel. In our case specifically, our brake lines are in very bad shape, so we wanted to replace them anyways, and we figured why not add some good brake feel at the same time. So, you can see here that this brake line has rubbed, or has been rubbed through, in multiple spots, which can be a little bit sketchy. Then on top of that, it’s actually started to break on the end here, so these are definitely due for a replacement.

Hand tighten your new brake lines into the caliper, and then tighten them according to the torque specs for your specific application. For our e30, it’s 14 to 17 meters. Do the same for your brake line and hard line fitting, again, using your special brake line wrenches.

 

 

The rear lines of an e30 have two soft brake lines that will be replaced. One of these is tucked above the subframe and near the rear trailing arm mounts. This line will drip a lot of brake fluid, so again, be ready to catch as much as possible with shop rags. Same concept applies here. Hand tighten, and then torque to spec. It is extremely important to hand tighten as far as possible, because cross-threading a break line fitting would be disastrous. It would require costly and time consuming repairs to the brake lines, or potentially even require you to replace the entire hard line, so make sure you take your time with this install. Do not over tighten any of these fittings, either.

The last line is located above your hub assembly and is quite short, but all the same concepts apply.

Time to take a step back and admire your newly installed stainless steel brake lines. Our Garagistic lines boast a beautiful red look that works very well with our KONI shocks and Eibach springs.

The final step of the install is to bleed your entire brake system. Make sure you always have enough brake fluid in your reservoir while bleeding, and start with the brake caliper that is the furthest away from your master cylinder. In our case, it’s the rear passenger side, and then the driver rear, and then the front passenger, and lastly, your driver side caliper. Have a friend pump the brake pedal, and then crack open the bleeder nipple on the brake caliper you’re bleeding. Close the nipple to avoid sucking in any air bubbles, and repeat until no more air bubbles come out of the caliper.

If you need further instructions, there are many great videos, but we’re not going to go into great detail on this particular DIY.

All right, guys. That’s all there is to it. It’s not a very difficult job, but if you don’t feel comfortable doing it, please make sure you get a professional to help you or do it for you. Brakes are obviously very important, so make sure you stay safe. Hope you guys enjoy the video. Please Like if you did. Share, subscribe, make sure you do all that good stuff, and check the parts in the description, and hopefully we’ll see you guys next time.

 

GARAGISTIC E30, E36, AND Z3 POWER STEERING DELETE BLOCK INSTRUCTIONS:

GARAGISTIC E30 POWER STEERING DELETE BLOCK INSTRUCTIONS:


A common modification on BMW E30, Z3, and E36’s are the infamous power steering delete blocks.  This modification offers a more responsive feel for your bemmer which translates for a more accurate reading on just how much you can push your car. Power steering is a revolutionary advancement in vehicle technology, but it’s more of a numbing effect on when tracking or auto-crossing your car. It’s an inherit handicap when you’re trying to get a better feel of how much more you can push your BMW in various turns.; the “numbness” that comes hand-in-hand with power steering is great for street driving, but for more of a “point-and-shoot” type steering, PSD’s are the way to go.


GARAGISTIC POWER STEERING DELETES CAN BE FOUND HERE:

 


GARAGISTIC POWER STEERING DELETE DIRECTIONS:

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Garagistic E30, E36, Z3 power steering delete blocks.


POWER STEERING DELETE QUICK NOTES:

 

There are numerous strategies when it comes to draining your PSD; Some people drain the rack completely and add a tiny bit of fresh power-steering fluid to lubricate the rack.

You can remove the power-steering pump, belt, bracket, hoses, and reservoir to drop some weight off the front of your e30, e36, or Z3.

A minor con of running no power-steering does increase the difficulty in turning the car under 5 miles per hour and parallel parking, however, the trade-off is the responsiveness you gain at higher speeds.

In all other situations its really not that bad and is totally worth the trade.


TOOLS FOR THE POWER STEERING DELETE INSTALL:

 

  • 17mm box wrench
  • medium size crescent wrench
  • carb spray

PARTS NEEDED FOR INSTALL:

STEP #1 OF PSD INSTALL:

  • Remove the old power-steering bolts on the steering rack.
  • Remove the smaller 17mm bolt first
  • Then remove the larger 22mm bolt with the crescent wrench it will clear the oil pan with a little persistence.
  • Then spray the area with some carb spray to clean off some road grime.

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E30 POWER STEERING DELETE PORTS

 

Here are the parts ready for assembly

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GARAGISTIC E30,E36,Z3 POWERSTEERING DELETE BLOCK KIT

STEP #2  OF PSD INSTALL:

  • first place a crush washer on each bolt.
  • then place the delete block over the bolts.
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POWER STEERING DELETE SET-UP

 

STEP #3 OF PSD INSTALL:

  • place a crush washer over the bolts.
  • then place this assembly on the rack and tighten down the bolts.
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STEP TWO OF POWER STEERING DELETE INSTALL

 

YOU’RE FINISHED INSTALLING YOUR POWER STEERING DELETE! e30 power steering delete

 


TL;DR
GARAGISTIC POWER-STEERING DELETE BLOCK INSTALLATION 

Installation is simple. You will need to remove the stock reservoir, pump and hoses. You’ll want to keep your stock banjo bolts and stock copper washers;  You’ll need them to  bolt your new power steering delete in place.  To take preemptive leaking issues, you’ll want to remove your power steering, this is a great way to stop any unwanted leaks from the “hose mod”. For any question regarding your Garagistic PSD install, email gofast@garagistic.com!

Garagistic PSD’s can be found here

Garagistic E30, E36, Z3 Front control-arm bushings

Garagistic E30 & E36 & Z3 Front control-arm bushings


Today we’re going to talk about e30 front-control arm bushings, specifically the ones that are on e30s, e30 m3s, e36s, and e36 m3s. Just like all of our other poly Bushings we make in the United States. They come in three different flavors. They come in 80 poly, which is a soft poly, you’ve got your 95 poly, which is a hard poly, then you’ve got delrin, which is incredibly hard.

 

E30s and E36s both came with options. They either had offset front control arm bushings, or center control arm bushings. That really depends on your goals or what your car had originally. E30 m3s all had offset front control arm bushings. Early e36 m3s also had offset control arm bushings. Standard e30s had center control arm bushings and late model e36 m3s also had center control arm bushings. Could you upgrade from a center to an offset? Yes, you could and you would basically gaining about 10mm of track, because you’ll basically move out your wheels.

 


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Take your pick of Garagistic front control arm bushings for your E30, E36, or Z3!

To buy Garagistic E30, E36, Z3 front control arm bushings click here!

 



That’s one of the main things why you would switch to a offset front control arm bushing. The 80s by far are most street friendly. It’s going to absorb a little bit more noise. It’ll still transmit a little bit more noise over factory, just because of the solid fact that the bushing is actually solid in geometry, where you would find the stock bushing would have holes. It was made for comfort. It is made to give a little bit. That way the noise was kept a little bit lower. 80 is your street-friendly one. It’s good for autocross, it’s good for occasional track days. Overall it’s a good bushing.

Your 95 is your step up from that. A car that’s a little bit more dedicated to tracking. A little bit more noise is okay to make sure that the control arms in the front don’t move. Delrin is your full, all out race, drift application where noise is not a concern. You don’t want the control arm to move at all. It will transmit a little bit more noise, but it will get the control arm to basically not move at all in unwanted directions. That would be the main purpose of having that.

The symptom of a bad control arm is basically, it’s that symptom when you first get your e30, basically you go over a bump and that steering wheel shimmies and wobbles and you don’t know what’s going on. That’s usually the control arm bushing. You go over a bump and the wheel does whatever it wants. The whole control arm moves as a unit, when there’s nothing to attach to. Cheap upgrade at the age that these e30s and e36s are nowadays, this is probably neglected part on the car. It’s something worth looking in to even as a factory upgrade for your e30 or e36. When it comes to E30 front control-arm bushings, Garagistic bushings are the way to go.  Our USA-made front control-arm bushings come with a lifetime warranty.

All parts can be found on the Garagistic app (ANDROID OR APPLE) or on our website www.garagistic.com and if you have any questions, please feel free to shoot us an email or give us a call. We’d be happy to help.


To buy Garagistic E30, E36, Z3 front control arm bushings click here!


DOWNLOAD THE GARAGISTIC APP!

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Garagistic: E30 rear trailing arm bushings

GARAGISTIC:
E30 rear trailing arm bushings


E30 rear trailing arm bushings; What are they and why do you need them? Today we’re talking all about Garagistic rear trailing arm bushings, specifically for your E30, your Z3, your 2002, your M Coupe, they all take the same rear trailing arm bushing, which would be similar to this one. It basically replaces the OEM part number 33329061945.

Basically what we got here is the flavors that we usually do all of our poly bushings kit in. You’ve got your 80, you got your 95, and you got your Derlin. Derlin being your all out race application. 95 being a little bit of dual purpose, you know a little bit more, emphasizing a little bit more performance than comfort. Then you’ve got your 80, which is basically your auto cross comfort. It’s a great street application. Often after these age these bushings are incredibly worn out and it’s time to replace them. Even when they’re brand new they don’t inherently have this lip on there, so they tend to kind of have a little bit of play anyway just because they’re actually meant to move a little bit to give you a little bit more comfort in your BMW.

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                                 Garagistic polyurethane bushings

 

For track enthusiasts that tends to be not what their main priority is, it’s basically the best handling possible. These definitely give that edge. It’s great for track, auto cross, drift. Even your street cars though, they can definitely benefit from the rear trailing arm bushings. Now this will also fit various other BMW’s like the 1602, 2002, E21, E12’s, E30’s, you know 318ti, the Z3 otherwise known as the angry shoe, it can benefit from having these kind of rear trailing arm bushings on there. Garagistic E30 rear trailing arm bushings are made right here in the USA. We also offer a lifetime warranty on all E30 rear trailing arm bushings.

All parts can be found on the Garagistic app (ANDROID OR APPLE) or on our website www.garagistic.com and if you have any questions, please feel free to shoot us an email or give us a call. We’d be happy to help.

Where to get Garagistic rear trailing arm bushings:

BMW SOLID DELRIN REAR TRAILING ARM BUSHINGS:
https://store.garagistic.com/BMW-E30-…

BMW 80A POLYURETHANE REAR TRAILING ARM BUSHINGS:
https://store.garagistic.com/80a-e30-…

BMW 95A POLYURETHANE REAR TRAILING ARM BUSHINGS:
https://store.garagistic.com/95a-e30-…


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Upgrading to Poly/Delrin E30, z3 318ti diff bushings!

POLY/DERLIN E30,Z3,318TI DIFFERENTIAL BUSHINGS


Today were going to talk about poly and Delrin differential bushings for your E30, your, E36ti’s, yours Z3’s. They all compatible.

They all take the same some the sub-frame bushings. They all take the same sub-frames pretty much, theoretically speaking, and the same diff bushing. Today here we got all of our diff bushings that we offer. It’s a Delrin version, which is basically for all-out race guys. It’s good for track application, if you really don’t want that diff to move, Delrin the one for you. It will transmit a little bit more noise, being that it is solid plastic basically.

Then you got your 80-Series, which is the softest poly available. It’s a happy street-friendly durometer hardness. It doesn’t transmit as much noise obviously as the Delrin, being that it will absorb a lot of the noise.  It’s really good for autocross, occasional track days, it’s just an all around good bushing. Then you got your 95 which is the hardest poly available. This is the one that we like, it’s the happy medium. It will transmit a ton, a little bit more noise than the 80 but not quite as much as the Delrin. They all basically have the same geometry, they’re solid bushing. As you can see, there is no holes like the factory bushing. The factory bushing have only is connected two or three points, and it was made for comfort, it was design for comfort. Even when you’re going with the softest poly it’s going to be a great upgrade over your stock bushing because it’s attached physically in more area. BMW-POLY-DELRIN-DIFFERENTIALDIFF-BUSHING-BMw-E30-E36-318TI-Z3

They all have a lifetime warranty,all made in USA, here in Westminster California. It’s meant to replace part number 331 71 135242 and that basically is found in E30s, Z3s and E36ti’s, even your 325iIX’s take the same differential bushing, so it’s also compatible with that. Now this will … it’s something that will add responsiveness, it’s going to limit differential movement.   A failed if bushing basically sounds like an ape trying to escape from your trunk. There’s usually thump, there’s things going on in the trunk. Usually when you put it in gear, stuff like that, you’re going to hear a bang thump something. Monkey’s trying to get out, usually it’s a because the differential bushing is gone, it’s literally not connected anymore.    Installation is simple you will need a press because it does get pressed into your factory differential cover. It’s compatible with M Coupe covers, so even if you’re running on your E30 the upgraded differential cover from the M Coupe or even your E36 or 318ti E36 unit, they’ll accept the M Coupe cover, this will fit it. It’s a great upgrade, very low-cost.  It’s a maintenance thing. These things are are quite old now and it’s usually time to replace them. Now this is kind of a while you’re at it thing. If you guys who put in LS1’s, the M60’s, S54 the big motors putting in a little more power. While you look at your differential it’s probably a good idea to look at our secondary diff mount.

This is one of the piece of the components, but basically what this does is it adds a second ear to your differential. Basically this came in later 36’s and stuff like that. BMW basically realized that they should have two years on the differentials. E30s obviously didn’t, they had one ear. This is a great upgrade, very low budget compared to the damage that could occur to your differential.  It obviously will require another differential bushing and it will also accept a stock differential bushing. That’s also a good upgrade. Hopefully this made your understanding of E30 diff bushings a little bit better. These Garagistic Poly/Delrin E30, z3 318ti diff bushings are made right here in the USA and come with a lifetime warranty.

You can also check out on our app and our website. If you have any questions, please feel free to drop us a line or visit us at our website.

All parts can be found on the Garagistic app (ANDROID OR APPLE) or on our website www.garagistic.com and if you have any questions, please feel free to shoot us an email or give us a call. We’d be happy to help.


BMW POLY OR DELRIN DIFFERENTIAL (DIFF) BUSHING – BMW E30 , E36 318TI , Z3


 


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Garagistic E30/E36 Brass caliper guide bushings and stainless steel brake lines

E30/E36 BRASS CALIPER GUIDE BUSHING AND STAINLESS STEEL BRAKE LINES


Doing things how they should be done.

Our brass caliper guides are meant to replace the rubber caliper guides in your e30, e36, e46, and other BMW. They only fit ATE calipers, something to take note of. On your e30 it won’t fit your girling type caliper. This is a great upgrade. The rubber that’s usually in there actually causes a lot of these two pieces of the caliper to actually be sloppy and actually give when you’re braking. There’s a lot of movement in there and it’s something that I’m pretty sure BMW made for comfort. For racing applications you basically want the best pedal feel, the least amount of unwanted movement in your calipers assembly. The brass caliper bushings can be a great upgrade. You pair that up with stainless steel brake lines and you got yourself pretty much, almost fully restored braking system. You got to change the fluid and the actual consumables. These two parts play a major role in the performance braking of your e30, e36, and e46.  Garagistic brass caliper guide bushings are made right here in the USA.

Check out the Garagistic app (ANDROID OR APPLE) or our website www.garagistic.com and if you have any questions, please feel free to shoot us an email or give us a call. We’d be happy to help.

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Garagistic USA made Brass caliper guide bushings

WHERE TO GET BMW BRASS BRAKE ATE CALIPER GUIDE BUSHING SET – E30, E36, E46, E92:

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Why upgrade your E28, E30, and E36 brake lines to stainless steel?

UPGRADING YOUR E28,E30,E36 STAINLESS STEEL BRAKE LINES


The upgrade that keeps on giving.

QUESTION: “Are stainless steel brake lines worth it?”

ANSWER: Only those who have driven a car with them know how truly worth it they are.


Today were going to talk about brake lines, stainless steel brake lines to be exact. Now we carry stainless steel brake lines for your E30, your E28, your E36. We got your other models coming soon like your E46. Upgrading to stainless steel brake lines is a great upgrade.
Usually your stock rubber lines, even when they’re brand new and in good shape, they expand and that can change pedal feel. Stainless steel brake lines you pretty much replaced them and you’ll never have to replace them again. They’re not like other lines. They don’t crack, they don’t break. They offer good pedal feel, a lot firmer pedal feel. A little bit more confidence inspiring braking. It’s definitely a good item to do, and it’s a safety item.
It’s something you should look as soon as you buy your E30, your E28, your E36. It’s something you should look at inspecting the brakes. Now, most commonly a kit like this … This is a E30 kit. It comes with a different amount of lines here. Then you got your front, you got your two front lines. Then you got your two lines that run above your sub-frame, and then your two lines that run to your rear calipers. This installation shouldn’t take too long you. The longest part of process is probably bleeding the brakes.
Other than that it’s probably a 30-45 minutes job, depending on if you have a lift or if you have jack-stands. It really depends. The hardest brake lines to replace on this would be the ones that are above the sub-frame, just because of physically reaching them. Other than that this is not a hard job. It requires some basic tools, some basic break knowledge. With all of our Garagistic products, there’s a lifetime warranty on our brake lines.

It’s something you should definitely look into. Having a failed brake line or failed breaks in general, especially if you’re auto-crossing or you’re tracking, anything really, even on the street. It could be a very dangerous thing, so be sure to check them out you. You can be found on our Garagistic app (ANDROID OR APPLE) or on our website www.garagistic.com and if you have any questions, please feel free to shoot us an email or give us a call. We’d be happy to help.


WHERE TO GET BMW STAINLESS STEEL BRAKE LINES:


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Garagistic: How to swap an E30 Front Subframe

Garagistic:
How to swap an E30 Front Subframe


The time has come, you have finally decided to reinforce your E30 front subframe; it’s not as hard as you might think!
Our friends at Salt City Euro’s show you how to get it done with the Garagistic reinforced E30 subframe!
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This is one of the most important modifications you should make if you’re driving your car hard or adding more power. The Garagistic reinforced subframe arrives freshly powder coated and includes welded tabs that make the sway bar and engine mounts much stronger. This is necessary to prevent breaking the subframe. This is a stock subframe that was used with a S50 motor. You can purchase  a reinforced subframe over at the Garagistic website.

There are multiple ways to complete this job, which will also depend on the configuration of your car. For example, we have no power steering, but we do have a 24 valve oil pan which prevents us from removing the steering rack on the car, as you could on an E30 with an M20 or M42. We won’t mention the power steering system again. You are on your own with that. Use this as a general guide.

We’re using an engine support bar to suspend the engine properly since we’ll be removing everything that is holding the engine in place. To complete this job you will need the following tools: the jack and jack stands, an engine support bar, a wrench with 13, 16, 17, and 19 mm sockets, and a ball joint removal tool. We also needed a small pry bar. Start by loosening your lug bolts and securing the car on jack stands. We then removed the wheels and loosened the control arm and tie rod end bolts. You’ll need a 19mm socket for the control arm and a 17mm socket for the steering rack tie rod ends. We’re using a basic ball joint tool to remove the ball joints. Before attempting to remove the ball joints, make sure you leave the nut flush with the threads of the ball joint. This will give you a larger surface to work with and protect your threads. Don’t be afraid to apply a lot of pressure, it takes quite a bit to pop those ball joints out.

Next, remove the two 17mm bolts holding the control arm bushings in place. You may have to carefully pry them off the car’s chassis. Remove the lower nuts holding the motor mounts in place. Disconnect your steering shaft from the steering rack. We are showing this on another car so you can clearly see it. Normally the engine would block the view. At this point you can carefully raise your engine to take all the weight off the motor mounts. We also used the jack with a 2×4 for extra safety. Once you’ve loosened and removed the four 17mm bolts holding the subframe in place, carefully lower the subframe. At this point it is time to disassemble your subframe assembly. Remove the steering rack, sway bar, and control arms, then transfer the steering rack to your new subframe.

It’s time to reinstall the e30 subframe on your car. This is much easier with the help of a friend. Align and reinstall your control arms. A small tip: if the ball joint is spinning and does not want to tighten, you can use a jack to press the joint into the knuckle. Reinstall your sway bar and tighten to spec. Finally, remember to tighten and torque your motor mounts to spec.
Congratulations.

You’ve successfully swapped the subframe on your E30. This job is time consuming and may require two people at times. We estimate that it takes 2 to 4 hours to complete depending on skill.

On a scale of 1 to 10, we’d give this job a 5, with 1 being a wheel change and 10 being a full top to bottom engine rebuild.

All Garagistic E30 Front Subframe reinforcements are made in house here in the USA.


Our friends at Salt City Euro’s show you how to get your Garagistic E30 Subframe done!

 

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Pandem E30 – BMW E30 Rocket Bunny Kit rendering has arrived!

We are proud to announce that we will be partnering with street standard! Our latest project e30 will have the infamous Rocket Bunny / Pandem Company body kit!

They have been working on the kit for over the past 6 months and are working with MIURA-San about this latest project e30.  After months of design the first rendering has finally surfaced on the internet! And boy is there a buzz about the kit.

Garagistic will be supplying poly bushings, all reinforcments, subframe service and the firepower under the hood (To be disclosed later on).

The New Pandem / Rocket Bunny Wide Body Kit is based off the popular BMW E30 Platform, utilizing the factory euro front fenders (will also work with plastic bumpers, will require modification for metal bumper cars).

The kit will include e30 Rocket Bunny / Pandem front Over Fenders 50mm, Rear Over Fenders 70mm, Side Skirts, Rear Duck Tail wing, and a front Splitter.

The price and release date will soon be disclosed.  Pre-orders will start some time this month! Keep your eye on www.store.garagistic.com

On to the pictures:

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So you want to know more about e30 Polyurethane Bushings?

80A

95A

Blue

Red, Green

Orange, Yellow Purple – Is there a difference? Which one is harder? What does the color mean? But I’m just looking for a slightly sportier feel. Is Urethane the same as Polyurethane? All of these questions, and more, will be answered.

What does it all mean?

I’ll save you the suspense – Urethane IS Polyurethane, just in a different form. And color means nothing in terms of performance. Some suppliers use a signature color to represent their company. Some companies don’t care what color is used. And some companies use colors to differentiate batches due to a slightly altered methodology of production or in other terms, a ‘date code’ identifier.

Yes, 95A is indeed harder than 80a and will give a sportier feel in the application of suspension and drivetrains. More on that later. But because 95A is harder than 80A, it is much more easily machineable (turning, facing, drilling, boring…etc). But why is it actually harder or softer?  For all intents and purposes, Urethane is the same as Polyurethane. Urethane is the monomer (ethyl carbamate). Basically, polyurethane is a long chain of urethane molecules, and they are bonded front to back, front to back, and so on….

The answer at a high level is: Isocyanates*, Polyols, and Crosslinking. Flexibility is attributed to the polyol, which is a soft, elastic polymer and its reaction with the Isocyanates (averaging 2 or more groups per molecule).

The theory is that high amounts of crosslinking within short chains combined with lower molecular weight polyols give tough or rigid polymers. Conversely, long chains, low crosslinking, and a higher molecular weight polyol give a polymer that is very stretchy.

Polyurethane crosslinking allows the polymer to be a three-dimensional network. As a result, the overall molecular weight is very high and allows polyurethanes the property of not softening up when heated, aka ‘thermosetting polymers’.

Polyurethane was invented during the WWII era by the German Otto BayerProfessor, Dr. Otto Bayer (1902-1982), known as the “father” of the poly industry. From there, polyurethanes can be found in adhesives, coatings, foams and finally flexible foams in the late 50’s. Today, you can see polyurethanes in virtually anything, including structural moldings for anything you see. Footwear, appliance, home, garage…etc. This is all great, but here we’re going to discuss how polyurethanes have shaped our automotive aftermarket culture for use specifically in swapped BMW’s.

Durometer (more commonly known as ‘Shore’) is nothing more than a measure of hardness. And within that, there are several different scales. Most common is the ASTM D2240 Type A for polyurethanes. Hence the “A” at the end of the number. (examples: 70A, 80A, 95A). Scale is from 0 to 100. The higher the number, the harder the polyurethane. A calibrated instrument is used to provide a very specific force to a poly of certain dimensions, creating an indentation in the material. The machine holds its indented force in the poly for 15 seconds, then is released. Immediately thereafter, the indentation is measured for depth. For shore “A”, a hardness range of 100-0 is proportional to the depth of (0.0” – 0.1”+). Aka, no indentation, the harder the material and therefore a durometer of 100 is assigned. Durometer is a dimensionless quantity. And because of that, there are many scales depending on the standard that’s used and the best scale is chosen based on the properties of the polyurethane. Here is a quick scale below of the durometer and the scale used for various materials. Again, most if not all automotive applications deal with shore, or scale “A”.

Mcmaster

Now that you know about the history of polyurethane, how it works, and how it’s measured hardness works, how about common-day applications.

You don’t always need 95A all around or 80A all round on your e30. Sometimes it’s critical to have harder poly on some areas of your e30 while softer on others. Factory e30 rubber mounts for most applications, including oil filled motor mounts are in the 60A-65A range. That’s pretty soft, but to give you comparison compared to stock, see below.

60-65A – Stock e30

70A – 25% stiffer

80A – 30-35% stiffer

95A – 75-80% stiffer

While the 60A-65A bushings do result in a lot of engine movement, especially during hard acceleration, the benefit is a comfortable driving experience and less noise transmission through your e30. M20 80a

For that perfect balance, I recommend Garagistic’s 80a e30 mounts.

 

Just a quick list of the benefits of Polyurethane bushings over stock e30 rubber.

  1. It allows your e30s suspension to react quicker to changes in road conditions, quicker steering, more responsive and receptive to your inputs as the driver. As a result, the power lost in the soft bushings is actually going right to your wheels!!
  2. Polyurethane is easy to install, no presses or special tools needed!
  3. Polyurethane outlasts rubber bushings. In most applications, it will last the life of your daily road driven e30!
  4. You can get custom offset fitment for race applications to help with wheel alignment, ride height…etc.

Want to go delrin on your e30? or even crazier and get solid bushings? Not a problem, only it is. If you daily drive your E30 and want to go delrin or solid, the ancillary setback is that the E30 chassis itself is not particularly designed for this type of vibration from the drivetrain and the roads. And because of that, things happen. Connectors dislodge, pins and electrical connections come loose, screws slowly back out and some bolts loosen up. For a car manufacturer to design to those strict requirements of solid mounted bushings, the car would look like a tank. You can use delrin or even a solid mounted configuration, but just beware of the long term consequences  on your e30 due to daily driving around town.

What else does Garagistic offer?

Well, a ton! E30, E36, and now even E46!!

Poly part1Poly part2

Thanks for reading and stay tuned for more posts. At least 2 new posts per week, with one of them guaranteed to be dedicated to the ongoing E30-LS1 project!!

* Recent efforts are attempting to minimize the use of isocyanates to synthesize polyurethanes, because the isocyanates raise severe toxicity issues. Non-isocyanate based polyurethanes (NIPUs) are in the works as a new class of polyurethane to alleviate environmental concerns.

Thanks to wikedia, McMaster for the information