Category Archives: E46

Get Comfort, modernization, and sport with this 3-series

BMW poly and delrin transmission bushings – E30, E36, E46, E21, E39

GARAGISTIC E30 Polyurethane/Delrin transmission bushings

Today we’re going to talk about Garagistic transmission bushings. Now these are our poly and derlin units. They can be found on virtually every BMW. They are all the same so your e30, your e36, e46, e90, e92s, f-series, all of them actually take the same transmission bushing. Even e21s got these so this is actually virtually compatible with almost every BMW made to an extent. Ask us, if you have any questions about that. Whether you should go with poly or delrin transmission bushings really depends the primary application of your car.

They are available in our 3 different durometers. You’ve got your 80 series which is your soft poly. You’ve got your 95, your hard poly and then your derlin. Now, you’re going to want to be careful which durometer you pick on your transmission as well as your differential because these are the only two bushings that will transmit a lot of noise. You will hear the transmission line with these kind of parts that are not factory like these.


TAKE YOUR PICK OF GARAGISTIC TRANSMISSION BUSHINGS

e30-transmission-bushing-derlin-poly-E30-E36-E46
BMW E30 E36 E46 E90 DELRIN        TRANSMISSION BUSHINGS

 


E30-E36-Z3-DELRIN-OFFSET-FRONT-CONTROL-ARM-BUSHINGS
E30, E36 AND Z3 DELRIN OFFSET FRONT CONTROL ARM BUSHINGS

BMW-80A-POLYURETHANE-TRANSMISSION-BUSHINGS
BMW 80A POLYURETHANE TRANSMISSION BUSHINGS

Your differential will make a noise and your transmission will make these noises as well. This is a bolt-through design so it’s meant to basically be a fail-safe. This bushing will basically never leave your transmission. It’s not isolated so it does inherently transmit a little more noise. Your 80 being the most bearable and your derlin being your full-on race application.

This is a very common neglected part on e30s, e36s, e46s. You’ll often see transmission bushing sagging and ripped and torn. Sometimes we’ve seen cars where they are disconnected in half, especially under track duty and drifting and stuff like that. Basically, these are our transmission bushings. If you have any questions about whether they are compatible with your BMW, please feel free to give us an email. They can be found on our online store at garagistic.com. They can also be found on our Garagistic app. The app if you don’t already have it is a great download. It’s a good way to get deals, flash sales, instructions so definitely take some time to download to app. As with all our poly stuff and almost all the things that we make, there’s a lifetime warranty so you can always rest assured you’ve got the Garagistic guarantee that that you got a perfect product every single time. Garagistic transmission bushings, just like all Garagistic bushings, are 100% USA made with a lifetime warranty.

All parts can be found on the Garagistic app (ANDROID OR APPLE) or on our website www.garagistic.com and if you have any questions, please feel free to shoot us an email or give us a call. We’d be happy to help.



garagistic-e30-bmw-app

apple-garagistic-app-e30-bmw

BMW E36 / E46 REAR TRAILING ARM POLY BUSHINGS (RTAB)

BMW E36 / E46 REAR TRAILING ARM POLY BUSHINGS (RTAB)


Topic of the day, rear-trailing arm bushings.  Welcome to the Garagistic Blog! Your premier BMW performance online store for E30’s, E36’s, E46, and other class of BMW.


BMW-E36-E46-rear-trailing-arm-poly-bushings-RTAB
We have them in 85a poly , 95a poly and delrin! 85a polyurethane transmission mounts are meant for that OEM + feel. That means you want a subtle upgrade for your street car without to much of a compromise in comfort, these are a happy medium. 85a are designed for the street enthusiast. 95a is great for dual purpose aggressive street and track applications. Derlin is best for race application only.

Today we’re going to talk about e36 and e46 rear trailing arm bushings. A often neglected part on e36 and e46. Now this part was on all of those chassis, whether it’s a 3-30, a 3-25, or an M3. The rear trailing arm bushings are all the same. Inherently, they usually float for comfort from the factory, and by float I mean, there is no lip on there, and they made that for comfort. Having that control and being able to absorb those bumps in the road, it was meant for comfort. That was the ultimate driving machine. In case you track your ultimate driving machines, that’s when you would upgrade your rear trailing arm bushings, which are at this age, most likely worn out anyway.

As with all of our bushings, they are made in the U.S.A., Westminster, California. They come with a lifetime warranty and again, we offer them in all of our three classic flavors. You’ve got your 80 poly, which is your street friendly, soft poly. It’s very good for auto cross, occasional track days. It’s a good trade off if you plan on driving your e36 or e46 on the street.

Then you’ve got your 95 here. Our color for that is usually blue, and that’s basically more of an auto cross track application. You track more often and it’s a good, hard, poly. It’s the hardest poly available.
Then you’ve got your derlin, which is basically, it’s a very hard basically track application, good for drift, good for road course. It’s basically meant for you’re all out track car, where you don’t want any other variables in your suspensions. Especially moving suspension components in unwanted directions. It comes with aluminum race, and that way it doesn’t touch the poly bushings or anything like that.
They all have a lifetime warranty. These can be bought on our website, at Garagistic.com or through out Garagistic app. Be sure to download the app if you don’t around have it. It’s a good way to get coupon codes and basically be in the know about our latest products. These are good with all the other e36, e46 bushings we make as far, you know, just like differential bushings and sub frame bushings, and front control arm bushings. Be sure to check out the website, we make all of them in house, and if you have any questions about the e36 and e46 rear trailing arm bushings, we would love to hear from you.  In summary, rear-trailing arm bushings are a must have for your track or street car.  Garagistic rear trailing arm bushings, like every other Garagistic bushing, are 100% made in the USA and come with a lifetime warranty.

All parts can be found on the Garagistic app (ANDROID OR APPLE) or on our website www.garagistic.com and if you have any questions, please feel free to shoot us an email or give us a call. We’d be happy to help.



garagistic-e30-bmw-app

apple-garagistic-app-e30-bmw

stop shameful shifting – e36 and e46 rear carrier bushing

So the rear carrier piece is a mod that we’ve seen become more popular in the e36 and e 46, and here’s why we think that makes sense.  (This part is available at the garagistic online store here.)

e46 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing e36 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing e31 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing e90 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing e92 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing
e36 and e46 rear carrier bushing

Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing for e46 and e36

Let’s for a moment talk about we like e36 and e46 in the first place. It feels good to drive them. The feel solid and comfortable, the ride is predictable when driving at the limit. You can manage driving fast pleasurably. There’s a classic Motor Week video from 1998 where Richard Hammond explains why the E46 is the perfect car. But it get even nittier and grittier.

The tiny qualitative details for for a car this old just make the car feel good. And why do we all like manuals? Because it feels good to shift. Unless of course you have old ratty rear carrier piece holding your shifter.

It is shameful, that’s right shameful, to have a piece of engineering that feels as sappy as a mechanical watch be ruined by a sloppy rough shifter.

e46 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing e36 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing e31 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing e90 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing e92 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing
E36 and E46 Rear Poly Carrier Shifter Bushing placement.

Enter garagistic. And we’re here for you e46 and e36 guys with our rear carrier pieces and carrier shiftier bushings. Made of 80a poly, lubricated to make the action smooth – giving that satisfying feel to all our e46 and e36 enthusiasts.

Install INPA/EDIABAS right here!

I’d like to introduce you to a comprehensive write-up on how to become a BMW specialized hobby-mechanic. It’s funny how seemingly intimidating this can be. As I search through the forums, I see so many people struggle and get confused with what is what, how to install, problems during installation, connectivity issues, driver issues, or simply don’t understand or become overwhelmed by the amount of information. To help the community, I’d like to break this information up into 2 stages.

The first stage is getting your computer setup with the basics, including a virtual machine with Windows XP SP3 which includes the wiring diagrams, technical information, and parts catalogue. All things that do NOT integrate with a car through OBDII.

The second stage is actual code reading through INPA, EDIABAS, WinKFP with a FT232RL cable.

VMware

STAGE 1:

This is nothing more than acquiring wiring diagrams, parts catalogue, which can also be found at www.realoem.com, and TIS, which is step-by-step instructions for basic and more complex repairs to yoru BMW. Here’s what you need to get started.

Go on Ebay and buy yourself a BMW service repair workshop manual including TIS/WDS/ETK/EPC/ETM.

TIS – Technical Information Systems. The most detailed, comprehensive step-by-step procedures, explanations, and pictorial diagrams from bumper to bumper you will ever see. All major and minor service and repair instructions included.

TIS

WDS – Wiring Diagrams (1982 – 2008). Every wiring diagram for all BMW’s. From components to pins to connectors and much more.  Fully interactive and user-friendly! There’ll be another blog post on how to navigate through these wiring diagrams specifically.WDS

ETK/EPC – “Parts Catalog” (Covers 1982-2013): The most detailed and extensive BMW parts catalog on the Internet. Now includes PRICES as well, something that was not included in earlier versions. Comes with exploded diagrams for a detailed analysis of all parts.

ETK

ETM – Electronic Troubleshooting Manuals. These are the old PDF’s for all BMW’s made in the 80’s/90’s & early 00’s. Electronic wiring diagrams and connector view guides that complement the Wiring Diagrams. 

ETM ETM2

This typically comes in one or two DVD’s and can be found on ebay for anywhere from $10-$15. The DVD comes with a VM (Virtual Machine) application for this to be installed on a Windows XP SP3 tunnel. This is mandatory and complements your stage 2 upgrade of INPA/EDIABAS/WinKFP/NCS…etc.

STAGE 2:

This is where things become more complicated…and for good reason. I would like to take some time to guide you through the detailed installation. Again, you absolutely need to either have a dedicated Windows XP SP3 computer, or you can have a windows 7, 8, or 10 computer, 32 or 64bit machine is fine, as long as you have a virtual machine set-up as I documented above in stage 1.

What you see below is taken from www.bmwcoders.com and is free information online.

However, the download links to the latest software is becoming harder to find. And as a result, I’ve taken the 700MB INPA file and have it on my Dropbox account which is free with the purchase of any M62/S62 Swap write-up upon request. Just go to www.macalent.com, purchase the M62/S62 writeup, and send a request to share the INPA file as well!

DOWNLOAD THIS ON YOUR PRIMARY COMPUTER, IF RUNNING WINDOWS 7, 8, or 10, OR IF YOU’RE RUNNING A VIRTUAL MACHINE, YOU MUST BRING ALL OF THESE FILES TO YOUR VIRTUAL MACHINE. It’s a 700MB file, so it takes a while, but all of the installation itself you see below must be done on the Windows XP SP3 machine.

So what is it, and what’s included in the download?

INPA/DIS – The most common version is 5.0.2. This is not an acronym for anything that I’m aware. It’s the portal for which you can connect directly to your car’s computer on all 1996+ OBDII BMW’s. This includes most if not all models from 1996 to TODAY. INPA does diagnostics including read/reset engine codes. It also communicates with your other computers (Transmission, ABS, Instr Cluster, Seats, Cruise Cntrl…..etc).

INPA

WinKFP – This program allows you to flash ECU’s and reprogram your module. Unless you know exactly what you’re doing, do not use this program. It takes some specialized knowledge in order to extract the files and reflash the ECU’s. This will be covered in future blog posts.WinKFP

NCSexpert – This is used for coding. You can enable options that are not normally installed on your car. It’s mostly in german, so you have to do a lot of research to ensure that you don’t unintentionally screw up your ECU.

NCS

Tool32 – This allows you to conduct specific tests on your engine. You can actuate VANOS, cycle your ABS pump or move your seats if you’d like. It’s mainly used for diagnosis more than what INPA can do. It’s useful if you’re trying to debug a problem on your BMW.

Tool32

What to purchase? You need a cable. That’s a fact. You need a DCAN + K-Line cable with a FT232RL usb chip inside the cable. The FT232RL chip is your interface from OBDII to your USB computer. There are cheap cables out there with other interface chips (CH340 for example). Do not buy these cables as they are unreliable and have connectivity and driver issues. The FTDI FT232RL Chip is much better for this application. See below for a picture of the cable you should buy. Your best bet is to do this:

  1. Go to ebay or google
  2. Type in the following search criteria: “DCAN cable FT232RL”
  3. Buy a cable no more than the $15-$30 range max.

DCAN + K-LINE Cable

Again, as long as it has the FT232RL Chip, you’re good.

FTDI FT232RL Chip

You might benefit from getting access to your diagnostic through this system as well. For that, I purchased an OBDII to Diagnostic adapter. It connects to your OBDII port of your DCAN Cable and plugs directly into your diagnostic port in your BMW ranging from 1996 to 2005 timeframe. After 2005, they removed the Diagnostic port altogether and now solely rely on the OBDII.

OBDII to Diag Connector

Now that you have the necessary cables, do not plug them in to your computer yet. Set them aside. You must access and download the software. Follow these directions EXACTLY as you see them below. The screenshots are again, from www.bmwcoders.com.

Unpack INPA and run Programminstallation/setup.exe Application

Choose language:

INSTALL1

Click “Next”:

INSTALL2

Next step:INSTALL3

Next step:INSTALL4

Next step:INSTALL5

Next step:INSTALL6

Next step:INSTALL7

Next step:INSTALL8

Next step:INSTALL9

Next step:INSTALL10

Next step:INSTALL11

Next step:INSTALL12

Next step: Select “STD:OBD”. Next step is very important. Whatever COM you select will need to match the driver when you install the DCAN Cable. I recommend you use the first available COM.INSTALL13

Next step: INSTALL14

Next step: (just skip 3x)INSTALL15

Next step:INSTALL16

Next step (restart your computer). If you have a Virtual Machine, restart the machine and let it reboot normally.INSTALL17

After restart:

Open :\Referenz.2005\INSTALL\Instprog.exe. It’s the application.

Click OK:

INSTALL18

Choose Language for UK:

INSTALL19

In next 2 windows click “Continue”.

INSTALL20

In next window choose BMW Group Rectification programs UK: Notice the Source drive. This is important that you unzip the INPA files to the correct path or it will not find it. ALL OF THE UNZIPPED FILES NEED TO BE PLACED IN YOUR C:\ DIRECTORY. Adding it as a subfolder will prevent you from moving past this step.

In next windows set 3 checkmarks:

INSTALL21

In next 2 windows click “Continue”

INSTALL22

After copying click “END”

Now, here’s where your DCAN + K-Line USB Cable come into play. This is where you may need to load your drivers as a one time setup. After that, plug and unplug as much as you’d like. Here is what you need to do.

  1. Open your VMware or equivalent virtual machine for Windows XP SP3.
  2. Plug in your DCAN Cable into your computer, USB 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 – Doesn’t matter.
  3. Depending on your computer or VM, you it might recognize the USB easily and load the FT232RL Drivers automatically. If that’s the case, then follow the steps and complete that driver installation. If that does not work, follow the steps below.

In my dropbox folder I’ve shared with you contains a driver called, “CDM v2.12.06 WHQL Certified”. Follow the instructions below for installation. AGAIN, INSTALL THIS IN YOUR VM OR WINDOWS XP SP 3.

When you plug in the cable, and you have question marks by the drivers, do the following:

Right click on the driver and click on update driver:

COM 1

Click next:

DCAN Install 1

Click browse: Then open your documents folder, or the folder that you saved all of the INPA files. DCAN Install 2

DCAN Install 3

Find the file “CDM v2.12.06 WHQL Certified”. Double click it and it will load the drivers.

DCAN Install 4 DCAN Install 5

DCAN Install 6

Click finish:DCAN Install 7

Click finish:

 

DCAN Install 8

There should be no more question marks or exclamation points.

DCAN Install 10

Now go back to your device manager and locate the usb for the DCAN cable. Ensure that the port is the same COM as that you have chosen when you originally set up INPA.  You can change the port by doing the following:

Right click on the Port and click “Properties”.

COM 1

On the port settings tab, click “advanced”

COM 2

On the drop down, pick the correct COM port that is not already in use (NEED TO USE COM1). Again, you must have the COM’s match from the initial INPA Installation. Click Ok, Ok, Ok, Ok, until all is good.

COM 3

Now’s a good time to restart your Windows XP SP3 machine or your VM.

Now is where it all comes together. Start up your VM Windows XP SP3, plug in your cable to the computer and then to your car. Turn the key to ignition and you should see the image at the top of this screen….. That’s success right there!

 

 

So you want to know more about e30 Polyurethane Bushings?

80A

95A

Blue

Red, Green

Orange, Yellow Purple – Is there a difference? Which one is harder? What does the color mean? But I’m just looking for a slightly sportier feel. Is Urethane the same as Polyurethane? All of these questions, and more, will be answered.

What does it all mean?

I’ll save you the suspense – Urethane IS Polyurethane, just in a different form. And color means nothing in terms of performance. Some suppliers use a signature color to represent their company. Some companies don’t care what color is used. And some companies use colors to differentiate batches due to a slightly altered methodology of production or in other terms, a ‘date code’ identifier.

Yes, 95A is indeed harder than 80a and will give a sportier feel in the application of suspension and drivetrains. More on that later. But because 95A is harder than 80A, it is much more easily machineable (turning, facing, drilling, boring…etc). But why is it actually harder or softer?  For all intents and purposes, Urethane is the same as Polyurethane. Urethane is the monomer (ethyl carbamate). Basically, polyurethane is a long chain of urethane molecules, and they are bonded front to back, front to back, and so on….

The answer at a high level is: Isocyanates*, Polyols, and Crosslinking. Flexibility is attributed to the polyol, which is a soft, elastic polymer and its reaction with the Isocyanates (averaging 2 or more groups per molecule).

The theory is that high amounts of crosslinking within short chains combined with lower molecular weight polyols give tough or rigid polymers. Conversely, long chains, low crosslinking, and a higher molecular weight polyol give a polymer that is very stretchy.

Polyurethane crosslinking allows the polymer to be a three-dimensional network. As a result, the overall molecular weight is very high and allows polyurethanes the property of not softening up when heated, aka ‘thermosetting polymers’.

Polyurethane was invented during the WWII era by the German Otto BayerProfessor, Dr. Otto Bayer (1902-1982), known as the “father” of the poly industry. From there, polyurethanes can be found in adhesives, coatings, foams and finally flexible foams in the late 50’s. Today, you can see polyurethanes in virtually anything, including structural moldings for anything you see. Footwear, appliance, home, garage…etc. This is all great, but here we’re going to discuss how polyurethanes have shaped our automotive aftermarket culture for use specifically in swapped BMW’s.

Durometer (more commonly known as ‘Shore’) is nothing more than a measure of hardness. And within that, there are several different scales. Most common is the ASTM D2240 Type A for polyurethanes. Hence the “A” at the end of the number. (examples: 70A, 80A, 95A). Scale is from 0 to 100. The higher the number, the harder the polyurethane. A calibrated instrument is used to provide a very specific force to a poly of certain dimensions, creating an indentation in the material. The machine holds its indented force in the poly for 15 seconds, then is released. Immediately thereafter, the indentation is measured for depth. For shore “A”, a hardness range of 100-0 is proportional to the depth of (0.0” – 0.1”+). Aka, no indentation, the harder the material and therefore a durometer of 100 is assigned. Durometer is a dimensionless quantity. And because of that, there are many scales depending on the standard that’s used and the best scale is chosen based on the properties of the polyurethane. Here is a quick scale below of the durometer and the scale used for various materials. Again, most if not all automotive applications deal with shore, or scale “A”.

Mcmaster

Now that you know about the history of polyurethane, how it works, and how it’s measured hardness works, how about common-day applications.

You don’t always need 95A all around or 80A all round on your e30. Sometimes it’s critical to have harder poly on some areas of your e30 while softer on others. Factory e30 rubber mounts for most applications, including oil filled motor mounts are in the 60A-65A range. That’s pretty soft, but to give you comparison compared to stock, see below.

60-65A – Stock e30

70A – 25% stiffer

80A – 30-35% stiffer

95A – 75-80% stiffer

While the 60A-65A bushings do result in a lot of engine movement, especially during hard acceleration, the benefit is a comfortable driving experience and less noise transmission through your e30. M20 80a

For that perfect balance, I recommend Garagistic’s 80a e30 mounts.

 

Just a quick list of the benefits of Polyurethane bushings over stock e30 rubber.

  1. It allows your e30s suspension to react quicker to changes in road conditions, quicker steering, more responsive and receptive to your inputs as the driver. As a result, the power lost in the soft bushings is actually going right to your wheels!!
  2. Polyurethane is easy to install, no presses or special tools needed!
  3. Polyurethane outlasts rubber bushings. In most applications, it will last the life of your daily road driven e30!
  4. You can get custom offset fitment for race applications to help with wheel alignment, ride height…etc.

Want to go delrin on your e30? or even crazier and get solid bushings? Not a problem, only it is. If you daily drive your E30 and want to go delrin or solid, the ancillary setback is that the E30 chassis itself is not particularly designed for this type of vibration from the drivetrain and the roads. And because of that, things happen. Connectors dislodge, pins and electrical connections come loose, screws slowly back out and some bolts loosen up. For a car manufacturer to design to those strict requirements of solid mounted bushings, the car would look like a tank. You can use delrin or even a solid mounted configuration, but just beware of the long term consequences  on your e30 due to daily driving around town.

What else does Garagistic offer?

Well, a ton! E30, E36, and now even E46!!

Poly part1Poly part2

Thanks for reading and stay tuned for more posts. At least 2 new posts per week, with one of them guaranteed to be dedicated to the ongoing E30-LS1 project!!

* Recent efforts are attempting to minimize the use of isocyanates to synthesize polyurethanes, because the isocyanates raise severe toxicity issues. Non-isocyanate based polyurethanes (NIPUs) are in the works as a new class of polyurethane to alleviate environmental concerns.

Thanks to wikedia, McMaster for the information

E36/E46 Rear Trailing Arm Bushing Symptoms

It was my one year wedding anniversary, and I decided to take my wife down to PA for the weekend to a bed and breakfast. We decided to take my wife’s 1997 328i because it was the best on gas and has been relatively reliable. On our way down I-81, we hit a medium sized pothole when going through a curve. It was at that point that I felt a somewhat apparent skip, or tug, to the outside of the curve on the e36. The Pennsylvania roadways are known for their never ending road work and I didn’t think anything of it because after all, I-81 is not kind to your suspension. Within the next 250 miles of travel, this skipping got slightly worse. And I realized that it wasn’t simply going over bumps and blips at high speeds. That didn’t bother me. In fact, skips in the suspension while going over bumps on a straightaway was manageable, practically imperceptible. The issue was going over these highway bumps on curves. That’s how I was able to isolate the behavior. But I was still in denial at this point, thinking to myself that it’s all in my head. Not to mention, I didn’t want it to ruin my weekend.

By the time we got to our destination 4hrs later, I couldn’t take it anymore. Even my wife asked, “what was that?”. I didn’t understand much about the E36 suspension at the time, but knew enough to know that it was coming from the rear of the car.

We parked at our bed and breakfast and I did what any BMW owner does first. Kick and push/pull the tires to identify anything grossly loose. Nothing. But I was so concerned that the next day I interrupted our Saturday afternoon activities by bringing the car to an independent shop and having the car put on a lift. And I’m glad I did! It was then and there that I found the glaring problem. And it was the rear trailing arm bushings, only one of them to be exact. Being an E30 aficionado, I quickly realized that the rear suspension design was nothing like the E36 equivalent.

If you take a look below, you’ll see the differences between the E30 and the newer E36 rear trailing arm bushings. And to save you the suspense, the E46 bushings are identical to the E36 style.

e30 e36 comparion

The E36/E46 trailing arm bushings sit inside of a metal enclosure, or “holster” if you will. Connected to the frame by a mere 3 bolts that are easily accessible. Just lift the car, take off the wheel, and remove the bolts as I indicated below:

  • Yes, the trailing arm will easily drop down.
  • Yes, it exposes the main bushing bolt you need to remove the metal enclosure very easily.

But Yes, you must continue to maintain pressure on the trailing arm downward in order to expose that accessibility. It wants to spring back toward the frame. Nothing that can’t be fixed with a piece of wood wedge between the trailing arm and the body.

  • No, it’s not easy removing the old bushing. You must cut the old out with a sawzall, or get lucky enough to press it out like below.
  • No, re-installing the new rubber bushing is not easy. In fact you need a homemade press to get this done.

You see, after this issue came up, I researched the heck out of it, and I determined that these bushings are quite easy to replace. Again, if you want to go stock rubber, you’ll have the added complication of making your own press to get the old bushing out and the new rubber bushing in. This can be harder than you think. Urethane bushings are a popular and tasteful upgrade to your E36/E46 rear suspension, but also are so much easier to install in that you do not need a press!!

e36 rear tab

Hey, at least you’re not dealing with replacing the E30 rear subframe bushings. See below for a quick comparison. It’s no picnic.

E30 E36 rear tabs

Upon closer inspection of my faulty E36 trailing arm bushing, I had mixed emotions. First, I was relieved that I found the part, and that this failure is a probable explanation for the behavior of the car on the highway, especially at highway speeds and on turns. However, based on how bad the old rubber bushing was, I didn’t know how in the world the car was able to function!!

The second discovered the issue, threw the indy shop $40 for his troubles, ordered the Garagistic E36/E46 urethane bushings and replaced them in a couple days later. Good as new. I got the 80A for the comfort version. In no way, shape, or form was my E36 going to be a race car!

garagistic parts

Nevertheless, I crawled home the next day, received the parts soon thereafter, and replaced both bushings in my garage with nothing more than a few hand tools, and the sawzall of course. After that, my E36 drove beautifully!

In the end, the car was repaired, thanks to Garagistics’s quick turn-around of quality parts, and I was able to drive it like I stole my wife’s 173k mile 328i!

Thanks for reading and stay tuned!

– Frank Macaluso

 

 

(main photo credit by:BBS Racing/RIH)